Monday, May 01, 2017

Ancestry.com

THIS PAST CHRISTMAS Linda gave me the gift of having my DNA analyzed through Ancestry.com. It was something I had desired to do since I heard of the process of checking your family roots. My mom always told me that my heritage was rooted in Ukraine and that on my dad’s side in Prussia. Sadly, Prussia, as a country, doesn’t exist anymore and the family records only go back to my grandparents. As far as I was concerned my roots were pretty shallow.

The idea of having my DNA checked struck me as pretty cool. A little spit in a plastic tube, put it in a special mailing envelope and in six weeks my history would unfold before me.

So I waited . . .

Then the day came when I received the results, complete with colored charts and graphs. The results? Not too surprising . . . my folks had it nailed down pretty well. I am Eastern European. I was hoping for some sort of exotic results, like I was Jewish or Hawaiian, but alas, my roots are firmly planted in Eastern Europe.

As I have pondered the results and gone over the charts I have been brought to the thought that the most important part of my heritage is not where I have come from, but rather where I am and where I can help my family go. As I write this I can look up and see a picture of my family. We hail from America, Bolivia and Burkina Faso. Three generations, an international mix, quite a lovely picture. I realize that my responsibility is not so much living up to my past, but preparing my family for the future. Specifically, that they know and follow Jesus Christ and that their homes are made secure in His love and grace.

History is important, it can give us a sense of rootedness to the past, but the roots we are nourishing now are much more vital. As a father and grandfather, how am I developing an environment that provides a rich soil in which my family can thrive? That is the question that must drive me today.

Providing a garden of God’s love, joy, hope and peace where there is security to grow as God designs. That’s this gardener's job.

How does your garden grow?

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